Apple: 12 Years Without The Master

In Case Study #23 I take a look at the 12 lost years of Apple.  Yeah, yeah many people will protest that statement.  But you cannot deny the malaise and flat-line existence of Apple during the tenure of Sculley, Spindler and Amelio.  Rather than dwell on items that you can read about in any number of books, I thought I’d use this week’s case study to discuss strategy.

This Episode includes a “How to” look at Blue Ocean Strategy and the now-famous four actions framework.  This is a key lesson you can certainly use in your business or career now and in the future.

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

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United Airlines – A Case Study in Crisis Communications

In Case Study #22 I take a look at the debacle United Airlines (Fly the UNfriendly Skies) found itself in when a customer was, literally, dragged from a flight by airport security.

We all saw the videos (See link: https://youtu.be/dASATLLvGRM) and the images were shocking. It started when United offered four customers $1,000 in flight credit in exchange for being bumped from a flight, which happens in air travel. United did not want to inconvenience four customers, but they needed to get four crew members to the next city because 200 passengers were at risk of being stranded on a flight in that other city. So, in order to take care of 200 customers in another city, they were forced to bump four customers – but United wasn’t saying “tough luck,” they offered $1,000 in flight credits. Usually, college students traveling alone rush to the front of the line to take these deals. It’s basically free travel in exchange for drinking at the airport and hanging out for several hours and taking the next flight.

In this case, three customers had taken the deal / been bumped (peacefully) and United has no choice but to choose a 4th passenger. This is usually done by evaluating frequent flyer status, who has checked luggage and ticket purchase factors to determine the “odd man out.” Keep in mind, the selected person is going to get the $1,000 flight credit. So United approaches Dr. David Dao and he says “no thanks” – but United says “Sorry sir, this isn’t a choice.” He then refuses to cooperate, which is understandable. United explains further and Dr. Dao won’t budge and United is now tweaked.

That’s when things go reallllllly bad.

By not cooperating with United, they then had no sympathy for him and he wasn’t going to change the fact that he was being bumped. My take: United could have and should have moved on to the next customer and Dr. Dao was NOT SMART. So now, United staff is thinking, “OK, this guy is now being a pain – let’s call security.” Dr. Dao then gets difficult with airport security which is NEVER prudent as we all know airport security and TSA have THEIR OWN SET OF RULES. Dr. Dao actually told them “you will have to drag me.” So they did and the rest is history and permanently memorialized on YouTube.

This Episode includes a “How to” case study on the 5-steps of crisis communications that you (and United Airlines) can use in the future:

  1. The Impacted People Must Come First
    • Express sympathy and empathy.
  2. Get Your Facts Straight – QUICKLY!
    • Immediately interview the people on your team who were there – not their managers!
  3. Be Transparent & Available to the Media
    • By getting facts straight, you can give a truthful story ONCE and NEVER change it (which makes things worse).
  4. OWN IT
    • Accept that it happened at your company, you don’t need to take legal responsibility if is not your fault. – but it happened at your company and you must own that part.
  5. Offer A Solution
    • You or your industry can learn from this and do something positive, and you can lead that effort.

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

Valuetainment- The Best Channel for Entrepreneurs!

Harley Davidson – How Cult Brands Are Created

In Case Study #21 I take a brief look at the history of Harley Davidson from the beginning and then examine cult brands and how Harley became a legendary brand.

This Episode includes a focus on the characteristics of Cult Brands:

1) DIFFERENT:
Consumers want to be part of a group that’s different

2) COURAGE:
Cult inventors show daring and determination

3) FUN & EXPRESSION:
Cult Brands are all about lifestyles

4) LISTENING:
Enable evangelists

5) TRIBAL:
Create Communities

6) OPENNESS:
Inclusive and Inviting

7) FREEDOM:
Promote Personal Freedom
Draw Power from Enemies

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

Valuetainment- The Best Channel for Entrepreneurs!

Nintendo – How A Legendary Company Started

In Case Study #20 I dive into Nintendo and take you back to the beginning of what became a legendary company in video games.

Nintendo started as a playing card company.  It would be 40 years after that humble start before it would venture into video games where it would make history.  In 1977 it launched one of the first small consoles that connected to early color TVs.  This was followed a couple years later by the arcade hit Donkey King and then the NES, the record-setting Gameboy and later the innovative WII.  Throughout the journey, Nintendo has been a bold innovator.  The path to success was not without challenges and pitfalls but Nintendo pushed through the tough times to secure its spot as an industry icon.

This success story includes a focus on two very important lessons:

– Focus on your core competencies – know what you or your company does well and WHY you do it well.

– When you need people with specific skills or experiences, don’t tough it out and limp along – go find those people NOW.

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

Valuetainment- The Best Channel for Entrepreneurs!

How Airbnb became a $30 billion success

In Case Study #19 I take a quick look at Airbnb an online community marketplace for people to list, discover, and book accommodations around the world.

Airbnb rocketed to a $1B valuation in 2 years after graduating the Y-Combinator incubator and now boasts a $30B valuation (Q1 2017) after raising over $4B.

This success story includes two very interesting and important lessons:

  1. Get Connected to customers or users early and effectively (don’t guess or rely on research reports).
  2. Find Mentors Early.  Bring in advisors that know the space or have functional expertise.  (And definitely consider applying to an incubator.)

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

Valuetainment- The Best Channel for Entrepreneurs!

AT&T How a Monopoly was Broken and Rebuilt

In Case Study #18 I take a quick look at the breal up of AT&T and how most of is was put back together – by SBC.  It’s a 20 year march to grow and reassemble a telecommunications (and now entertainment) giant.

  • In this case study – you will learn about the need to think broadly and be opportunistic – regardless of the size of your company.

Grab your notebook, take notes and if you see something interesting, please leave a comment or share the video on social media along with your thoughts – join the conversation.

Come learn every Friday and take your company to the next level – subscribe to the Valuetainment channel on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4

Valuetainment- The Best Channel for Entrepreneurs!